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ColorCode 3D- A Relatively New and Propriety System for Anaglyphic Stereo

ColorCode 3D is the 3D technique that was used for several ads in SuperBowl 2009 and NBC's 3D broadcast of the sit-com Chuck on Feb, 2, 2009.

color_code_glasses.jpg

ColorCode 3D viewers have blue and amber colored lenses in place of the traditional red and blue (or cyan) lenses of the more common anaglyph glasses. On their website they explain that the color information is conveyed through the amber filter and the depth (or parallax) information is conveyed through the blue filter.

The technicians at ColorCode in Denmark claim that their system represents a significant improvement over red-blue anaglyph processes, giving the viewer full color stereoscopic images without dimness or distortion.

They also say that their method is most compatible with the widest range of display media: prints (inkjet, offset press, digital photo printing), mobile devices, computer and TV screens, (CRT. LCD, LED & Plasma) displays, analogue and digital projectors (LCD, DLP, LCOS).

Since ColorCode 3D is new to me, I'd like to invite the NYSS audience to provide us with feedback.

Have you used this method to produce anaglyphs? Did you catch the SuperBowl ads or the NBC program Chuck? Tell us about your experience and rate the quality of the 3D.

Please note: All responses that are not accompanied by a Paypal donation will be immediately deleted.

OK, not really. But we are having our 2009 Membership Drive ($25 dues) and we encourage you to join and/or donate. Anything you can afford to give will be deeply appreciated (or appreciated in depth).

The NYSS is run entirely on your support, so if you like the website or enjoy coming to our events, please help us out. Thanks!

Update 3/11/09: Steen Svendstorp Iversen from ColorCode has responded to our question about the new blue/amber anaglyph format (below).

What is special about ColorCode 3-D compared to earlier blue/amber, is the exactly defined amount of filter leakage (crosstalk) and the algorithm we apply to cancel the experienced ghosting introduced by that.

The leakage results in better color rendition, especially in skin tones.

Further, it is correct, that blue is not a detail carrying color, but modern compression (MPEG2 at high bitrates and H.264) yields enough blue detail for a good result. Any analog composite video cable in the chain, however, is destructive to the experience (like is the case with red/cyan, really).

A positive side effect of blue not being a detail carrying color is, that many ColorCode stereograms look quite acceptable to the naked eye as 2D images; an important feature in many applications, including broadcasts.


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Comments (5)

I saw the NBC "Chuck" episode tonight. It was very, very, shallow stereo 3D...for openers! I also looked at stills on their Color-Code website, & they looked better, and were deeper on my LCD monitor.

Color Code will work better if the images are shot differently and composited with more advanced technique.

We, at Anachrome 3D Group, are now using a 3 lens system to shoot anything that might eventually wind up in an anaglyph image. That allows control of ghosting, while, boosting the depth cues on the actors or the "main subject", usually placed at the point near the surface of the "stereo window".

eoj otodep:

NYSS member (and 3D expert) Gerald Marks writes:

It seems a bad idea to me but I am going to hand out Color Code glasses to my class Thursday to analyze what is good and bad about the system and to compare it with the anaglyph I love. (I picked up a kazillion of the glasses at my local CVS store) Of course what gets to me is the chutzpah of their patenting blue/amber anaglyph. . .as if it hadn't been tried long before! It's like those @#$%^ patents on phantogram!

The way I set up for anaglyph in Photoshop allows you to have a different Layer Comp for Color Code or any system and change the same file to any kind of system.

Color Code ignores some fundamental facts about the nature of color vision and the way these facts are incorporated into our television system and into digital compression. Blue is not a detail-carrying color the way Green & Blue are. If you want a different anaglyph, a better approach might be Green to one eye and Magenta (Red +Blue) for the other. I have glasses made in the 1950's that way by the Marks Polarized Corporation. That company spells their name exactly the way I do but they are not family, as far as I know. Edwin Land hated them and when I met Edwin at MIT in the 80's he ran away when I said my name, before I could explain that I was not related!

What is special about ColorCode 3-D compared to earlier blue/amber, is the exactly defined amount of filter leakage (crosstalk) and the algorithm we apply to cancel the experienced ghosting introduced by that.

The leakage results in better color rendition, especially in skin tones.

Further, it is correct, that blue is not a detail carrying color, but modern compression (MPEG2 at high bitrates and H.264) yields enough blue detail for a good result. Any analog composite video cable in the chain, however, is destructive to the experience (like is the case with red/cyan, really).

A positive side effect of blue not being a detail carrying color is, that many ColorCode stereograms look quite acceptable to the naked eye as 2D images; an important feature in many applications, including broadcasts.

Paul:

Can this technology be used to broadcast a three dimensional camera feed over the Internet ? If so, do you need to have two cameras ?

Thanks for the answers.

Check out www.3dgp.com where they have a complete website and game done in colocode 3D, personally I think the colours look a lot richer using colorcode style images...

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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on February 1, 2009 3:05 PM.

The previous post in this blog was 900 theaters nationwide to present Henry Selick's "Coraline" in 3D; John Hodgman voices Coraline's Dad.

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